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What do you need to know about Italian wine?

Italian grape varieties are diverse and abundant, with over 350 grape varieties grown throughout the country. Each region has its unique grape varieties that reflect the region's terroir, climate, and cultural traditions.


Some of the most well-known Italian grape varieties include:


  1. Sangiovese: A red grape variety grown primarily in Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna, and used in Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino, and other famous wines. It has high acidity, medium body, and flavors of cherries, tobacco, and herbs.

  2. Nebbiolo: A red grape variety grown mainly in Piedmont, used in Barolo, Barbaresco, and other prestigious wines. It has high tannins, high acidity, and flavours of roses, tar, and red fruit.

  3. Barbera: A red grape variety grown in Piedmont and Emilia-Romagna, used in Barbera d'Asti and other wines. It has high acidity, low tannins, and flavors of red and black fruit.

  4. Pinot Grigio: A white grape variety grown in Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Trentino-Alto Adige, and Veneto, used in Pinot Grigio and other wines. It has high acidity, medium body, and flavors of citrus, apples, and pears.

  5. Vermentino: A white grape variety grown in Sardinia, Tuscany, and Liguria, used in Vermentino di Sardegna and other wines. It has high acidity, medium body, and flavors of citrus, herbs, and minerals.


When it comes to pairing Italian wines with food, there are no strict rules, but there are some guidelines to follow. Here are some suggestions:


  1. Pair Sangiovese with tomato-based dishes, grilled meats, and hard cheeses.

  2. Pair Nebbiolo with roasted meats, game, and truffles.

  3. Pair Barbera with pasta dishes, pizza, and spicy food.

  4. Pair Pinot Grigio with light seafood dishes, salads, and vegetarian dishes.

  5. Pair Vermentino with seafood, grilled vegetables, and light pasta dishes.


Of course, these are just suggestions, and you should feel free to experiment and find your perfect pairings.

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